England’s NHS will provide artificial pancreas to thousands of diabetes patients

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England’s National Health Service (NHS) he said Tuesday that “thousands of children and adults” with type 1 diabetes will receive a “pancreas transplant” to help manage their insulin. A closed hybrid system – a sensor under the skin that sends wireless readings to an external wearable pump, which delivers insulin when needed – can help patients avoid the dangers of type 1 diabetes without worrying about sticks or injections.

This is not the first time device of its kind. Tandem they make similar insulin pumps in the US later received FDA approval in 2019. Gizmodo documents that a company called iLet found FDA approval for the same device last year. Although the NHS has not said which tools its program will use, what is different here is a government-sponsored medical system that provides free treatment rather than a special privilege for the best. (Laughter.)

The hybrid closed-loop method starts with a sensor placed under the skin, which monitors the glucose level regularly. The sensor transmits the data wirelessly to the pump, worn externally, which delivers the correct dose of insulin. The “hybrid” part of its name comes from the fact that other inputs, including the input of carb foods, are still needed in the self-regulating system.

The government released the exact figures of 269,095 people in England with type 1 diabetes, and showed how many people could benefit from it. The NHS says local branches will start identifying patients for the program from Tuesday.

“Diabetes is a complex and persistent problem, but these practices are making a big, life-changing difference – improving the health and quality of life of people with diabetes,” Colette Marshall, chief executive of Diabetes UK, wrote in the NHS newsletter. release announcement release. “This is a very important time and we will work with the NHS and others to make sure that the best coverage gets to people as quickly as possible.”

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