Dolphins Eavesdrop Partners To Avoid Difficult Efforts


You might think that it would be easy to hate a Risso dolphin. These species are found in almost every corner of the globe. Their sharp, red-and-white heads make them one of the most recognizable sea creatures. And as with other cetaceans, they move in groups and keep singing: Squeezing, crying, and whistling helps them to understand their presence in the water. Their world of friendship is wonderful.

“They’re kind of very vocal,” he says Charlotte curé, an architect. “Sound is important to them.”

Curé works for the Joint Research Unit at France Acoustics, where she reveals how cats use the noise of their environment to make informed decisions. Dolphins are known to communication directly to each other, and repeat-finding their meat before striking. But many years ago, he wondered if he could take a message from another dolphin that had not been made.

But the problem is, even the dolphins speak, Curé or Running Visser, a collaborator and Risso ethnographer, speaks the language. So instead of just looking at what the dolphin seems to be saying, they just looked at how they do it moving. In their experiment, the Curé team tested the dolphins’ response when investigators parked their boats at the top and shouted at them from another group.

After four years of field service, the Curé team recorded their results: the initial evidence the cetaceans listen to each other and use this information to decide where to swim. For example, male genital mutilation, which is known to abuse women, calves, and other male genital mutilation, drove away many dolphins. Their research appeared last month in Animal Identification.

The project is the work of an animal intelligence expert, according to Caroline Casey, a marine biologist from UC Santa Cruz who did not participate in the study. “It’s just like human beings,” he said. “And I like when experimentation can show what seems like the obvious to us, but it has never been shown in the past in a very complex animal.”

Besides, while Risso dolphins are easy to see, it is difficult to listen to their secrets. But since cetaceans are very intelligent and rely on language, contacting them can help us understand where our language begins. In fact, knowing how to copy and chase dolphins is a new tool to take care of them.

The dolphins are not noisy animals only. Scientists have confirmed that the black males, which are at odds with each other, look at each other’s battles that ye may know how ye ought to answer him. Big female songbirds watch male competitions, then to deceive their wives are the most popular tweets. Birds and mileme it is also heard at home looking for a mate for food. In both cases, researchers have suggested that vocal cords trigger a specific behavior. Therefore, to test the animals’ response, researchers record the words on the speaker and see what happens.

But the Curé team was keenly interested in the interconnectedness of the underwater world, and no wonder. Until about a decade ago, researchers did not have the tools to prove that such large marine mammals could hear long-distance communication. “Now we have the weapons,” says Curé. Along with the drawing boat speaker underwater, the researchers used drones to track movements from the top as well as tags-suction-cupped acoustic sensors – to record their tests.

They are followed by about 14 dolphins and dolphin groups set up on the shores of Terceira Island, in the Azores. Dolphins often swim directly. But Curé claimed that the discovery of knowledge of what could lead them astray. Sitting in a “toy car,” he could sing three kinds of words. One of them was the clamor of dolphin vultures looking for food – a “dinner bell” thought to be an enticing flag that some swam to take away. Another recorder had social whistles as well “A powerful explosion” men’s noise, thought to be a threatening signal that drove away women and men from their rivals. They also play from the wives and calves, thinking they are politically neutral.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *